Patch Tuesday with PowerShell

It’s actually Wednesday here, but yesterday was another “Patch Tuesday” and Microsoft released its update packages.

So – it’s time to patch! 😊

Not sure how you’re patching your machines, but just wanted to make you aware of the nice PowerShell module called PSWindowsUpdate.

You can read more about it on the official PowerShell Gallery page and also here.

In short – this module takes care of controlling Windows Update from within PowerShell on your local and also remote machines.

And… I know it’s not nice like the Windows Update screen, but it does its job! 😊

To make use of it, you’ll have to take care of some minor prerequisites and install it via PowerShell Gallery.

Once done, you can use it to control Windows Update:

To make it easier for you, here is the installation script which takes care of… everything:

And that’s it – we’re done!

Happy patching!

Cheers!

Yet another “Kubernetes with Raspberry Pi” post

There’s a ton of the tutorials on how to get Kubernetes installed onto your Raspberry Pi, so… let’s write another one. 😊

As mentioned in my last post, I’ve found my forgotten Raspberry Pi, and played around with installing and configuring Raspbian Buster on it.

Today, I wanted to check if it will be possible to install Kubernetes onto such small machine – they are many articles on the “widest of the world’s webs” that say “Yes, it can be done!“, so I’ve decided to give it a try! And I chose to follow one of them (seemed like a nice reference).

As you remember, I’m starting with a cleanly installed (and just slightly customized) Raspbian Buster and building it from there.

And I’ll be using kubeadm for installing my cluster.

So, once I had at least two machines (my Raspberry Pi for the “control plane” and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Hyper-V virtual machine as the “node” – you can read more about it here), I prepared them like this:

  • install Docker (in my case)
  • change the default cgroups driver for Docker to systemd
  • add cgroups limit support (for my Raspberry Pi 3)
  • configure iptables
  • disable swap (this one was a bit challenging)
  • prepare for Kubernetes installation (source, keys, kubeadm)
  • install Kubernetes “control plane”
  • add flannel
  • add a node to the cluster
  • test with some workload

One thing that bothered me (on Buster) was disabling swap in a way that it also stays disabled after a reboot (I know, it’s the details that eventually get you) – after a while, I’ve stumbled on this forum post and the solution provided by powerpetedid the trick! Thank you, @powerpete! 😊

And finally, details about the each step are here (outputs are commented and somewhat redacted/condensed):

Seems to be working (😊):

Cheers!

P.S. I’ve read about some having issues with flannel and using other network options (didn’t have this one). Also, if you’ll have issues with iptables (v1.8+), maybe you’ll need to switch to legacy version (didn’t have this one either).

Installing the KB2920189… successfully!

The other day, I’ve written about an issue with installation of update KB2920189 for Windows Server 2012 R2 (post called [TIP] Latest “Patch Tuesday” & errors installing update). So, the problem I was facing was failing installation on Generation 2 virtual machines, with Secure Boot enabled.

Actually, you can overcome this problem easily by reading the documentation before it happens or… with PowerShell after (OK, you can use GUI also, but who uses it nowadays?)! Smile

As I’ve already mentioned, all you need to do is just one thing – install the BitLocker feature on your server.

(yes, “-Restart” is optional – if you want, you can restart your server manually, of course)

image

After that, BitLocker is installed, and you can successfully install the KB2920189 also.

Second (not official) approach on installing this update on Generation 2 virtual machine, as I’ve written in the mentioned post, is to uncheck Secure Boot, install the update, and then check the Secure Boot option again.

This can be easily done using the following script:

We can now install this “problematic” update as the Secure Boot feature is disabled:

image

image

…and Secure Boot is enabled again (“nothing” happened)!

Of course, you can do all of this manually, but then again – why do we have PowerShell? Smile

Cheers!

P.S. I’m no PowerShell expert… just like to automate some things. Smile