blog.kaniski.eu I just wanna learn!

12Jan/200

Something new – Google Cloud Certified: Associate Cloud Engineer (ACE)

So, I've decided to end last year in style - as my Christmas gift to me, I've purchased Linux Academy (monthly full-access plan) and taken their course to prepare for the Google Cloud Certified: Associate Cloud Engineer (ACE).

And yesterday, I've taken and passed the certification exam (OK, still waiting on the official e-mail from Google; it takes 7-10 days, as it said on the exam). 🙂

UPDATE: It's here!

This brought me another nice badge (as this is "a thing" now):

Why?

Well, I've been curious.

I know - "curiosity killed the cat"... except, this time, it didn't! 🙂

Let's get serious - I wanted to better understand how and why would someone use Google Cloud (GCP) instead of (or even in conjunction with), I don't know, Microsoft Azure or AWS or even Exoscale.

The only fair way to do this would be to learn about the platforms, spend some time using them and decide about their strengths and weaknesses (for your specific scenarios)... while keeping in mind that things move and change pretty fast now (something you'll be missing today in, for example, Microsoft Azure, will perhaps be there in a matter of months, so... nothing is really final)! And this is exactly what I did/do/will keep doing - trying to stay on top of things.

How?

I've already mentioned that I've taken the course, but here is a short list of what I've used, with links:

  • Linux Academy course (they say it adds about +30% on top of your GCP knowledge - sessions are nice, updated regularly, practice tests and hands-on labs certainly help a lot(!)... and you can take a monthly subscription)
  • hands-on experience in using GCP (open up a free account, add custom domain, set up identity provider, bring up some Kubernetes clusters, store some files, ..., just play around a bit and try the things out by yourself!)
  • exam guide (it's nice to read what they'll test you on)
  • official documentation (yes, you'll need to read something as well... sorry)
  • practice exam (it's there, it's free, try it out... more than once!)

What's next?

Considering Google Cloud - I'll probably take a peek at Professional Cloud Architect certification as well.

Considering other learning/certifications - as I've done all of the Microsoft Azure exams (that were available at the time), maybe I'll continue with deepening my knowledge about AWS, who knows... it all depends on my next adventures.

Considering everything else - we'll see where I'll end up in 2020 (I'm pretty sure I won't be doing what/where I was doing in 2019, but we'll see ;))!

Happy 2020!

7Jan/200

Veeam Best Practices

My last post in 2019 was about Veeam Backup for Office 365 - I think it's only fair to continue the story. 🙂

If you haven't noticed this short post by Niels Engelen, you may be unaware that good people at Veeam put together a Best Practice Guide for Veeam Backup for Office 365!

Great thing about this guide is that it's really a "live document", which covers design, configuration and operations for VBO and it will be updated regularly, so make sure to bookmark it and check it from time to time!

Also, there is a Best Practice Guide for Veeam Backup & Replication, which should be bookmarked and checked regularly as well, in case you forgot about it! 🙂

Cheers!

7Aug/190

Deploying Kubernetes on top of Azure Stack (Development Kit)

If you had a chance to deploy Azure Stack or Azure Stack Development Kit (ASDK) in your environment, maybe you've asked yourself "OK, but what should I do with it now?".

Well, one of many things you "can do with it" is offer your users to deploy Kubernetes clusters on top of it (at least, that was what I did the other day... on my ASDK deployment) - in short, official documentation has you pretty much covered. I know, Azure enables it as well... and the process here is similar, or - the same.

The main thing you have to decide at the beginning, is if you'll use Azure AD or ADFS for identity management (the same as with Azure Stack deployment, if you remember, from my previous posts). Why - because the installation steps differ a bit.

Once you decide it (or you ask your Azure Stack administrator how it's done in your case), you can proceed with the installation - I assume you have your Azure Stack/ASDK up and running.

Next, in the admin portal (https://adminportal.local.azurestack.external/), you'll need to add the prerequisites from Azure Marketplace (for this, if you remember, your Azure Stack/ASDK has to be registered):

Once done, you're ready to set up the service principal, to which you'll then assign the required permissions on both - the Azure side and on the Azure Stack side! (don't forget this detail... it is well documented, but easy to overlook)

In case you don't give your service principal the required permissions on both "sides", you'll probably get the "error 12" and your deployment will fail:

And you can see details in the log:

So... be careful with service principal and permissions! 🙂

Next thing you'll need to make sure of is that you create a plan and an offer, but set your quotas right! It depends on your Kubernetes cluster deployment settings, but if you'll go with the defaults, the default quotas (disk, in particular) need to be expanded!

If not, you'll probably get this error:

If you were careful while reading the official docs (with a few "lessons learned" in this post), and you've made it to here... you're probably set to deploy your first Kubernetes cluster on top of your Azure Stack/ASDK.

In the user portal (https://portal.local.azurestack.external/), you now have the option to deploy something called Kubernetes Cluster (preview):

Here you really can't miss much - you'll give your deployment a brand new (or empty) resource group, user details (together with your public SSH key, of course), DNS prefix, number and size of nodes and service principal details:

After that, your deployment starts and runs for some time (it, again, depends on your hardware and settings you've chosen for your cluster). Hopefully, it will end with this message:

If all is good, you can SSH into one of your master nodes and see the details of your cluster:

One other thing that would be nice to have is the Kubernetes dashboard - the process of enabling it is well documented here:

And - you're done!

You now have your own Kubernetes cluster deployment on top of your Azure Stack/ASDK! How cool is that?! 🙂

One last thing to note - currently, this is in preview (as it says on the template), but... it works. 🙂

Cheers!

1Aug/190

Microsoft AZ-500 down, more to go

Another month, another Azure cert! 🙂

So, for the last couple of weeks, I was reading about, learning and playing around with Azure security technologies, mainly as a preparation for AZ-500 (Microsoft Azure Security Technologies) exam.

And then... today I took the exam and... PASSED!

I must say, with a few certificates under my sleeve, this exam was not the easiest I took. I was feeling prepared and still - passing it demanded concentration on the details and a bit of thinking! Nonetheless, it's over now - one down, more to go!

Note that... by passing this exam, I'm not automatically an Azure security guru (!) - it just means that I know a thing or two about what Azure offers in terms of security and how it works. 🙂

What did I use to prepare?

There is a great book about Azure governance called Pro Azure Governance and Security, written by my MVP colleagues Peter De Tender, David Rendon and Samuel Erskine. It's purpose is not to be an exam prep guide, but to tackle into the world of governance and security features available within Microsoft Azure (which are part of the exam, who would know).

There is also a great post, containing a bunch of helpful AZ-500 material from Stanislas Quastana, located here, and Thomas provided some useful links in his post here and even did a webinar on Azure Security Center (hosted by Altaro) the other day - you can find the recording here.

Of course, there is also the official exam page with skills measured and docs.com.

And... don't forget to try things out yourself! There is also a free Azure subscription, you know?! 🙂

If you'll be taking this exam - good luck, hope this resources help you!

Cheers!

8Sep/170

10 years of this blog…

Today is the 10th anniversary of my first blog post! Since then, well... a LOT happened! 🙂

(image source)

Let's see what the next 10 years bring!!! 🙂

Cheers!

15Jul/170

Microsoft MVP… times 8!

It’s that time of the year again (although, a bit earlier than previous years).

I’m proud and grateful that I’ve got one more Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) award in the Cloud and Datacenter Management area!

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP)

Eight years… it’s a lot (and yes – I’m feelin’ a bit older, few grays here and there, but they say it’s actually “wisdom”, so... it’s fine)! 🙂

I would once again like to thank the nice people at Microsoft and everyone who continuously supports me – my family and friends, my colleagues and the community! And now… it’s time to continue – there is so much to learn, experience & to share! 🙂

Cheers!

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8Sep/150

Important – removal of the kaniski.info domain

Dear all,

As the "transition period" from kaniski.info to kaniski.eu slowly comes to its end, I've decided that I will no longer host this blog at *.kaniski.info (and, with that, my @kaniski.info e-mail address will cease to exist).

Note that this blog will remain hosted only at https://blog.kaniski.eu/, and you can still contact me using my @kaniski.eu e-mail address. Smiješak

Cheers!

12Jun/140

We’ve moved!

So, today I’ve decided to move this blog to another “home” – from now on, it will be located at blog.kaniski.eu.

I’ve decided to consolidate and reorganize things some time ago, and now I’ve finally managed to find the time needed (if Microsoft can change, who am I not to? Smile).

I certainly hope that current (and future) ideas will be better organized this way. As you can see, I’ve created redirection on the previous location, and will leave it there until the domain expires.

Sorry for the inconvenience and thanks for reading!

P.S. I’m also fixing bad links and missing images – if you have something to report, send me an e-mail at my_name@kaniski.eu (yes, the About page is “about to happen” also). Thanks.

24Dec/130

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

I wish that you spend the holiday season with your families and loved ones, 'offline' if possible. I'll be back in 2014 with more technical posts, and with more than ever 'consistent publishing schedule', I hope. 🙂

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, all!

2Oct/120

Microsoft MVP for another year…

So… I'm Microsoft MVP for another year – for 3 years in a row (and counting Smile).
This year I’ve also changed my expertise, and now I’m part of “Virtual Machine” MVPs.

Thanks to everyone that constantly supports me in my “IT adventures” (special thanks goes to my family - without them nothing of this would be even remote possible!).

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