Using Synology to recover data from another hard drive

So, you have a disk filled with data you need and no external case or something similar (extra slot in your PC, server, …) that can be used to recover this data – if you have a Synology NAS device (with one or more free slots), you can use it to easily accomplish your task. Smile

Note: This may work with any other NAS device, but I’ve tried it only on Synology (the only devices I have access to – if you have some “extra” hardware from another vendor, send it to me and I’ll be happy to try it out on your preferred vendor’s equipment Smile).

I’ve had the Synology DS-411j device (yes, I know… but it’s budget friendly and works just fine, at least) and a Seagate 320 GB SATA drive (NTFS-formatted, holding all the data that needs to be recovered):

SynologyDS411j

 

Couple of steps that should be done before the “fun part” (a.k.a. “hardware steps”):

  • shut down the NAS device (maybe not necessary, but if your device is located “back there, under all of that useful stuff (actually junk, but…)”, it’s recommended Smile)
  • open the enclosure (there are 4 screws on the back of the device which can, hopefully, be removed just by hand)
  • insert the hard drive you’re recovering from into an empty slot
  • close the enclosure (or leave it open if you’ll be removing the drive just afterwards)
  • start the device

 

And now the “fun part” (a.k.a. “software steps”):

  • open the device’s administration website by using your favorite web-browser
  • check Storage Manager to see if the newly added drive is visible (as Not Initialized)

image

  • enable Telnet or SSH (if not already enabled) (under Control Panel Terminal & SNMP)

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  • open a Telnet or SSH console session to your NAS device (PuTTY is one of the tools that can help you)

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  • enter the following commands into your console window:
df -k
### OUTPUT ###
# Filesystem           1K-blocks       Used Available Use% Mounted on
# /dev/md0               2451064     526740   1821924  22% /
# /tmp                     59248        736     58512   1% /tmp
# /dev/vg1000/lv      1913548228 1167461820 745984008  61% /volume1

fdisk -l /dev/sdd
### OUTPUT ###
# Disk /dev/sdd: 320.0 GB, 320072933376 bytes
# 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders
# Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
# Device        Boot    Start    End      Blocks      Id    System
# /dev/sdd1                 1  38914   312568832       7 HPFS/NTFS

mkdir /tmp/ntfs
ntfs-3g -o ro /dev/sdd1 /tmp/ntfs

df -k
### OUTPUT ###
# Filesystem           1K-blocks       Used  Available Use% Mounted on
# /dev/md0               2451064     526740    1821924  22% /
# /tmp                     59248        736      58512   1% /tmp
# /dev/vg1000/lv      1913548228 1167461820  745984008  61% /volume1
# /dev/sdd1            312568768  270452224   42116544  87% /tmp/ntfs

dir
### OUTPUT ###
# drwxrwxrwx    1 root     root             0 Oct 11 10:11 $RECYCLE.BIN
# drwxrwxrwx    1 root     root          4096 Oct 11 10:11 .
# drwxrwxrwt   10 root     root          1300 Oct 20 22:11 ..
# drwxrwxrwx    1 root     root             0 Oct 11 09:55 FILES
# drwxrwxrwx    1 root     root             0 Oct 11 08:44 System Volume Information

cp -R /tmp/ntfs/FILES /volume1/public/

And there you go – you can copy or move (i.e. recover) your files to Synology shares (or somewhere else). When you’re finished, you can easily unmount the hard disk drive or even leave it inside (initialize and use it), as you wish.

Thanks for reading!

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